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Sarasota Weather

Energy Savers: Attic Insulation

Call Timothy Parks Construction today for a free consultation.

(407) 383-9118 Orlando (727) 260-7344 Tampa Bay

(941) 270-2677 Sarasota

Attic Insulation 

Properly insulating and air sealing your attic will help reduce your energy bills. Attics are often one of the easiest places in a house to insulate, especially if you’d like to add insulation.

Before insulating or deciding whether to add insulation to your attic, first see our information about adding insulation to an existing house or selecting insulation for new home construction if you haven’t already.

Warning: if you think you have vermiculite insulation in your attic, there’s a chance it could contain asbestos. Don’t disturb it. Only insulation contractors certified to handle and remove asbestos should deal with vermiculite insulation.

Attic Insulation Techniques

logo_pink_is_green Loose-fill or batt insulation is typically installed in an attic. Although installation costs may vary, loose-fill insulation is usually less expensive to install than batt insulation. When installed properly, loose-fill insulation also usually provides better coverage.

Before installing any type of insulation in your attic, follow these steps:

  • Seal all attic-to-home air leaks. Most insulation does not stop airflow.

  • Duct exhaust fans to the outside. Use a tightly constructed box to cover fan housing on attic side. Seal around the duct where it exits the box. Seal the perimeter of the box to the drywall on attic side.

  • Cover openings—such as dropped ceilings, soffits, and bulkheads—into attic area with plywood and seal to the attic side of the ceiling.

  • Seal around chimney and framing with a high-temperature caulk or furnace cement.

            • At the tops of interior walls, use long-life caulk to seal the smaller gaps and holes. Use expanding foam or strips of rigid foam board insulation for the larger gaps.